Vintage Pulp Aug 22 2013
V-LUXE MODEL
It takes a lot of work to make a cover look this good.

This issue of France’s V magazine was published today in 1948. On the cover, in a lovely photo-illustration, is a person named Corinne Lander, who we looked up and found nothing about whatsoever, which means she was probably a model or showgirl. She appears inside as well in a small feature explaining (if our French is right) how much work went into her posing, shooting and retouching—sixty-two hours total, we’re informed. Also inside you get art from Jean David, swimming lessons using a chair, and more. To see our other Vs click its keyword below. 

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Vintage Pulp Jul 11 2013
V A LA MODE
They’re only being nice because they want to know where he bought his paisley sarong.

Above is the cover of an issue of V published today in 1947. Inside are various celeb and cinema features, a photo-comic written by the famed Maurice Dekobra, a back cover by Jean David, and plenty of photography, including the feature “Don Juan les pins,” or Don Juan of the Pines, whatever the hell that means. Also a bit of a mystery is the baffled looking cover star surrounded by six swooning women and a dog. He’s damnably familiar but we can’t quite place him, and since this is V we’re talking about, the editors have predictably failed to identify him. He’s a Columbia Pictures player, according to the caption, but that’s all we got. Anyone recognize him? Drop us a line. Thanks.

Update: So we have the answer from Nick, who informs us this is Arthur Lake, who played Dagwood in the U.S. television series Blondie, based on the famous comic strip. Thanks a million for that info. This also seems like a good time to thank not just Nick, but all Pulp Intl. readers. Your support and knowledge is essential to making this site work and we always appreciate it.

Update 2: Now it all becomes clear. A reader informs us that "Don Juan les pins" is a play on words. Juan-les-pins is a popular vacation spot in France, located on the Côte d'Azur between Nice and Cannes.

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Vintage Pulp Sep 13 2012
V, VOIR, VOILA
Whatever it was called, we love it.

More from France today with V magazine of winter 1965. This particular issue, in the masthead in extremely small print, reveals that V is short for Voilà. Other issues we have do not mention that, so it’s news to us, and probably to many other people as well, especially because we shared an issue a while back that clearly says on the cover “Supplement au No. 445 de Voir Magazine.” So it is Voilà, Voir, or just V? To tell the truth, we wondered in the past if the 1950s V was the same as the earlier magazine that published through the ’40s, but it was. The publisher, editor, and even the street address changed, but we’ve seen an issue from 1949 that shows an unmistakable visual transition between the two versions. If indeed the magazine was ever actually called Voilà, or Voir, the full name never appeared on the cover, as far as we know. Speaking of covers, this one was painted by Raymond Brenot, aka Pierre-Laurent Brenot, who was both an artist and a successful fashion designer, and he joined a special fraternity of brilliant V cover artists such as René Caille, Jean David, and Georges Pichard. The interior illustrations are from Brenot, Pichard, Le Gano, Renoir and others. Plus there are photos of Margaret Lee, Catherine Frank, Mara Berni, Liten Østern, dancer Sonia Vareuil, et.al. Generally, the more a magazine costs us the more pages we scan, just so we can feel like we got our money’s worth. This one was ten euros, so below are more than thirty images for your enjoyment.

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Vintage Pulp Sep 20 2011
BED COMPANY
I’ve done the early to bed bit, now if you’ll handle the early to rise part, this day should work out just fine.

Above, two great, provocative covers by Jean David for Pedro Alvarez’s Bonjour, Princesse... and Dora Christobal’s La maîtresse de Santiago, published by Seine Editions for their collection Plume au vent, 1956/1957. 

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Vintage Pulp Jul 8 2011
V COOL
Les bicylettes de Paris.

Here’s another of our recent French acqusitions, a July 10 1949 issue of V, with an Alex Quinio front cover. Below you get art from Jean David, who drew both the comic strip and the rear cover, and you also gets lots of images of French people frolicking in the sun. Probably that's what we like about this magazine—it depicts the good life, which is something we always aspire to. Actually, thinking about it, what the hell are we doing indoors right now? There's a glass of cold white wine calling our names. See you later.

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Vintage Pulp Jun 1 2011
SO VERY V
V employed three of the most talented but least-known pin-up artists of the pulp era.

The French magazine V is probably one of the most visually pleasing and collectible periodicals ever published. The early issues featured photo-illustrations of movie stars, but starting in the 1950s V began to showcase provocative pin-up style cover paintings from a succession of three artists—Georges Pichard, René Caille and Jean David. All were geniuses; none are well known outside collectors circles and France, where they lived and worked. But popularity is never a true measure of value—Pichard, Caille and David Vs can go at auction for thirty, forty, or even fifty dollars. We've seen them listed for even more, though those went unsold as far as we can tell. Vs with Pierre-Laurent Brenot covers are also highly regarded. This one, V Sélections 57, with a Pichard cover and Brigitte Bardot, Christine Carère and Marilyn Monroe inside, dates from winter 1957. We have a couple more of these we’ll share in their entirety as soon as we get in the mood to do the scanning. Meantime see some 1940s V covers here and here

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Vintage Pulp Aug 22 2009
Melange Francais

French Pulp Cover, La Vipére De Shanghai
French Pulp Cover, Virage A L’Est
French Pulp Cover, SOS
French Pulp Cover, SOS
French Pulp Cover, La Coupure
French Pulp Cover, Sabine
French Pulp Cover, Le Gang des Toubibs
French Pulp Cover, Meurtres à l’ O.N.U.

Random mix of French pulps, circa 1950s, except for Sabine, which carries a copyright date of 2005. The rips and creases on that one are a deliberate part of the cover design intended to make the book look vintage, and it worked—we bought it before realizing it was just a pulp knock-off. C’est la vie. It cost a euro so we can’t really complain.

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
April 25
1939—Batman Debuts
In Detective Comics #27, DC Comics publishes its second major superhero, Batman, who becomes one of the most popular comic book characters of all time, and then a popular camp television series starring Adam West, and lastly a multi-million dollar movie franchise starring Michael Keaton, then George Clooney, and finally Christian Bale.
1953—Crick and Watson Publish DNA Results
British scientists James D Watson and Francis Crick publish an article detailing their discovery of the existence and structure of deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, in Nature magazine. Their findings answer one of the oldest and most fundamental questions of biology, that of how living things reproduce themselves.
April 24
1967—First Space Program Casualty Occurs
Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov dies in Soyuz 1 when, during re-entry into Earth's atmosphere after more than ten successful orbits, the capsule's main parachute fails to deploy properly, and the backup chute becomes entangled in the first. The capsule's descent is slowed, but it still hits the ground at about 90 mph, at which point it bursts into flames. Komarov is the first human to die during a space mission.
April 23
1986—Otto Preminger Dies
Austro–Hungarian film director Otto Preminger, who directed such eternal classics as Laura, Anatomy of a Murder, Carmen Jones, The Man with the Golden Arm, and Stalag 17, and for his efforts earned a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame, dies in New York City, aged 80, from cancer and Alzheimer's disease.
1998—James Earl Ray Dies
The convicted assassin of American civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., petty criminal James Earl Ray, dies in prison of hepatitis aged 70, protesting his innocence as he had for decades. Members of the King family who supported Ray's fight to clear his name believed the U.S. Government had been involved in Dr. King's killing, but with Ray's death such questions became moot.

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