Vintage Pulp Jan 28 2015
WORLD WAR WELLS
Argentine edition of classic takes art in different direction.

This 1938 printing of H.G. Wells’ 1898 masterpiece La guerra de los mundos, aka The War of the Worlds, leaps right to the top rank of covers we’ve seen. It was published by Buenos Aires based Editorial Tor, a company founded in 1916 by Juan Carlos Torrendell. Despite the demented Mickey Mouse aspect of the fanged alien, and the fact that it’s a completely different vision from any other cover treatment we’ve seen for the book, we think the overall feel of the piece is very much on target. Unfortunately we have no artist info.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 28 2015
DR. SINISTER
A prescription for murder.

As long as we’re doing Spanish language pulp today, we might as well share this cover for El siniestro Doctor Crippen, or The Sinister Doctor Crippen, written by Enrique Cuenca for Barcelona based Ediciones G.P., and published in 1960 as part of its low cost Enciclopedia Pulga collection. Eventually, about five-hundred books appeared as part of the collection, including translations of Jules Verne, Robert Lewis Stevenson, and other classic authors. This particular novel is of course based on the strange story of Hawley Harvey Crippen, aka H.H. Crippen, the American physician and fugitive who murdered his wife Cora in 1910 and was eventually hanged in London’s HM Pentonville Prison. Many of the covers we’ve seen from Enciclopedia Pulga are nice, so we’ll try to revisit the collection a little bit later.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 26 2015
FAR AND WIDE
British adventure magazine takes readers to the ends of the Earth.

The British men’s adventure magazine The Wide World debuted in 1898 and lasted all the way until 1965. That’s not quite National Police Gazette or Argosy longevity, but it’s still very good. During that entire time, a span encompassing two global conflagrations and various economic fluctuations, it failed to print only four issues—including once when a German aerial bomb flattened its pre-press facility. 

The magazine’s founder was George Newnes, who also published The Strand Magazine, Tit-Bits and other titles. With The Wide World he hit upon an audacious marketing gimmick—he assured readers that every word in the magazine was true, and made “Truth Is Stranger than Fiction” the publication’s slogan. This claim was hot air, of course, but that idea—and the conceit that adventurers were a sort of global club that owed allegiance to one another—helped make the magazine a success among readers who considered themselves men of the world, or longed to be.
 
A strong focus on exotic lands and inscrutable dark-skinned inhabitants resistant to the white man’s ordained incursions likewise played well with readers, as Britain’s colonial era evolved into a post-colonial one. That makes The Wide World a repository of some ugly attitudes, however the magazine also managed such feats as being the first publication to report the death of Butch Cassidy in Bolivia, and publishing stories by many literary notables. Above and below you see a collection of covers, nicely rendered in pulp style by various artists.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 25 2015
BUNGALOW SELF ESTEEM
Sorry to barge in. Remember you said your life was total shit and couldn’t possibly get worse? The sheriff is here with a county crew—he says he has to bulldoze your shack.

We’ve already shared Robert McGinnis covers twice this month, but since it’s in the charter of pretty much every pulp website to feature him constantly, here’s another contribution—Deadly Welcome, written by John D. MacDonald, 1959, for Dell Publishing. Probably a substantial proportion of you have read this, but if not, it deals with a government employee sent by the Defense Department back to his home town, the fictional Ramona Beach, Florida, to locate a missing government scientist. Top marks.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 23 2015
RED VELVET VARIATIONS
Monroe’s famous photo changes like a chameleon.

We’ve shown you a couple of Technicolor lithographs with overlays. Before we get off the subject for a while we want to show you one more—this effort featuring Marilyn Monroe. The image is best known as the centerfold of the debut issue of Playboy from December 1953, but it actually hit the market as part of a 1952 calendar, which means it went on sale in late 1951. The only text featured on those original calendars was the title “Golden Dreams,” but the above lithograph has both a title and Monroe’s name because it was a re-release designed to take advantage of her growing fame. That fame had waned since a favorably received role in 1948’s Ladies of the Chorus, but had been rekindled when she admitted to newspapers in early 1953 that she had posed nude. The Playboy centerfold further turbocharged her ascent, and the famous velvet photo kept appearing over and over again, mainly as calendar shots in 1955, 1956, and 1958, and at least three times with different types of obscuring overlays. In all those images, as well as the one above, Monroe is facing the opposite direction from the photo that appeared in Playboy. However, the Playboy centerfold is reversed from the original calendar shot, so it was Hugh Hefner who flip-flopped her. But from whichever direction you look at her, and in whatever garb she appears, Monroe is still exquisitely Monroe. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 22 2015
NAME BRAND PULP
What’s in a name? Everything, if it’s the title of a vintage paperback.

Above and below you will find a large collection of pulp, post-pulp, and sleaze paperback fronts that have as their titles a character’s first name. There are hundreds of examples of these but we stopped at thirty-two. The collection really highlights, more than others we’ve put together, how rarely vintage paperback art focuses on male characters. The prose is virtually all male-centered and male-driven, of course, but because the mid-century paperback market was male-driven too, that meant putting women on the covers to attract the male eye. We tell our girlfriends this all the time, but they still think we just don’t bother looking for male-oriented vintage art. But we do. For this collection we found two novels that have male characters’ names as their titles, and we looked pretty hard. If we had to guess, we’d say less than 5% of all pulp art is male-oriented. In any case, the illustrations come from the usual suspects—Barye Phillips, Robert McGinnis, Jef de Wulf, Paul Rader, et al., plus less recognized artists like Doug Weaver. Thanks to all the original uploaders for these.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 21 2015
HANDS-ON MEDICINE
Actually, you are going to feel a thing. It’s going to be a lengthy procedure, too.

Sleaze fiction is rife with novels about dodgy doctors and here’s another one from Stuart Friedman, succinctly titled The Surgeons, from Monarch Books, 1962, with cover art from Harry Schaare. This is the second Friedman/Schaare pairing we’ve posted. The other is the infamous Fathers and Daughters, which you can see here. Actually, while we’re on the subject, maybe check out a few of our other bad doctor novels here, here, and here. Oh, and here too. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 20 2015
DUET RIGHT
If you're really going to keep sitting there, use your heel and hit that high a-sharp for me at the end of the chorus.

Above, Murder Me for Nickels, 1960, by Peter Rabe, née Peter Rabinowitsch, for Fawcett Publications’ subsidiary imprint Gold Medal Books. The novel tells the story of a low-level organized crime flunkie named Jack St. Louis who works for a jukebox magnate. Because they control the boxes in their unspecified town and its environs they also control who scores a hit record, which brings not just money but a lot of wannabe starlets their way, some of whom Jack funnels through his side business—a recording studio. Unfortunately, Jack gets caught in a takeover gambit when mobsters from nearby Chicago try to strongarm his boss’s jukebox racket. Making matters worse is his boss’s available wife, who wants to be a singer. Well reviewed everywhere. The cover art is by Robert McGinnis. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 19 2015
A COOL MILLION
The languages were different but we’re pretty sure the appreciation for Raquel Welch was the same.

We’re looping back to the former Yugoslavia today, this time with a rare film program for Raquel Welch’s One Million Years B.C. If it seems we just talked about this movie, you’re right. We shared a promo from the film last week. What you see above is the front of a dual language promo pamphlet, half written in… well we aren’t sure. The language situation is complicated there. Half in Serbo-Croatian and half in Slovenian, we think. Feel free to correct us. In any case, it’s a pretty cool little item.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 19 2015
HODGING YOUR BETS
French illustrator James Hodges shifts from the magic of books to the magic of cards.

We mentioned in our October post on French artist James Hodges that he moved into playing card design as his career progressed, so today we thought it would be nice to show you some of those designs. Above you see an example of his collectible work for the French playing card and tarot card company B.P. Grimaud, owned by Baptiste Paul Grimaud and based in Paris. Grimaud’s cards go back to 1848 when he purchased a workshop that had been in business since 1750, so we’re talking about a time-honored art here. Hodges’ designs were pin-up influenced, but he also painted stylized card faces, and we’re pretty sure he did some of the backs too. We have an assortment of card fronts below, and you can see more work at his website. The post where we mentioned his playing card career is here, and we have a collection of Hodges book fronts here.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Next Page
Featured Pulp
japanese themed aslan cover
cure bootleg by aslan
five aslan fontana sleeves
aslan trio for grand damier
ASLAN Harper Lee cover
ASLAN COVER FOr Dekobra
Four Aslan Covers for Parme
History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
January 29
1916—Paris Is Bombed by German Zeppelins
During World War I, German zeppelins conduct a bombing raid on Paris. Such raids were rare, because the ships had to fly hundreds of miles over French territory to reach their target, making them vulnerable to attack. Reaching London, conversely, was much easier, because the approach was over German territory and water. The results of these raids were generally not good, but the use of zeppelins as bombers would continue until the end of the war.
January 28
1964—Soviets Shoot Down U.S. Plane
A U.S. Air Force training jet is shot down by Soviet fighters after straying into East German airspace. All 3 crew men are killed. U.S forces then clandestinely enter East Germany in an attempt to reach the crash but are thwarted by Soviet forces. In the end, the U.S. approaches the Soviets through diplomatic channels and on January 31 the wreckage of the aircraft is loaded onto trucks with the assistance of Soviet troops, and returned to West Germany.
January 27
1967—Apollo Fire Kills Three Astronauts
Astronauts Gus Grissom, Edward White and Roger Chaffee are killed in a fire during a test of the Apollo 1 spacecraft at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Although the ignition source of the fire is never conclusively identified, the astronauts' deaths are attributed to a wide range of design hazards in the early Apollo command module, including the use of a high-pressure 100 percent-oxygen atmosphere for the test, wiring and plumbing flaws, flammable materials in the cockpit, an inward-opening hatch, and the flight suits worn by the astronauts.

Advertise Here
Reader Pulp
It's easy. We have an uploader that makes it a snap. Use it to submit your art, text, header, and subhead. Your post can be funny, serious, or anything in between, as long as it's vintage pulp. You'll get a byline and experience the fleeting pride of free authorship. We'll edit your post for typos, but the rest is up to you. Click here to give us your best shot.

Pulp Covers
Pulp art from around the web
www.talvipaivanseisaus.com/kirjallisuus/p/puumakirjat/pk3039/pk3039isot/pk33iso.htm dougsploitation.blogspot.com/2008/12/make-yuletide-gay.html
lesbianpulp.blogspot.com/2015/01/lesbian-pulp-and-media-mail.html illustrated007.blogspot.com/2015/01/book-covers-from-greece.html
savedfromthepaperdrive.blogspot.com/2015/01/rafael-cortiella-paperback-covers.html https://archividiuruk.wordpress.com/2014/07/01/la-regina-dei-ladri/
Pulp Advertising
Things you'd love to buy but can't anymore
PulpInternational.com Vintage Ads
derangedlacrimes.com
www.shocktillyoudrop.com
www.shocktillyoudrop.com/
http://www.shocktillyoudrop.com
http://www.shocktillyoudrop.com/
www.thesmokinggun.com
www.deadline.com
www.truecrimelibrary.co.uk
www.weirdasianews.com
lovecraftismissing.com
doplacebo.blogspot.com
muller-fokker.blogspot.com
salmongutter.blogspot.com
www.glamourgirlsofthesilverscreen.com
tsutpen.blogspot.com
creepingirrelevance.tumblr.com
thepulpfictionproject.blogspot.com
burleskateer.tumblr.com
darwinscans.blogspot.com
superwoobinda.tumblr.com
www.cinemaretro.com
aucarrefouretrange.blogspot.com
eldesvandelabuelito.wordpress.com
www.nationalroadbooks.com
sangreyakuza.blogspot.com
menspulpmags.com
killercoversoftheweek.blogspot.com
About Email Legal RSS RSS Tabloid Femmes Fatales Hollywoodland Intl. Notebook Mondo Bizarro Musiquarium Politique Diabolique Sex Files Sportswire