Vintage Pulp Feb 14 2016
THE BERN ULTIMATUM
Get your filthy mitts off her this instant! I told you before—under my rules everybody gets a piece!

This issue of Adam was published this month in 1977. It has a nice cover featuring a tussle on the Hudson River with New York City in the background, and Bernie Sanders looking very pissed off. And really who can blame him? This situation is inherently unequal and there’s no need for it because, clearly, there’s more than enough to go around. The story being illustrated here is Mike Rader’s “The Man They Killed at the Waldorf,” about a murder plot with national security implications. This is probably one of the last stories he published in the magazine, and it’s certainly one of his most fanciful, involving a weather control device, a kindly professor, Russian spies, and a murderous femme fatale. Also in this issue you get the usual assortment of great illustrations and pretty models. The final photo feature is called “Irish Eyes,” and for some reason we prefer that last shot upside-down, maybe because there’s a Dorian Gray sort of weirdness to it. Scroll to see what we mean. Go on—Bernie would want you to.

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The Naked City Feb 2 2016
FINE LINE-UP
Packed with mysteries inside and out.


Line-Up Crime Detective offers up a nice slate of true crime stories in this February 1952 issue, but the real crime here is that the cover art is uncredited. Curse you, lax editors at Astro Distributing Corp. Who could this artist be? We don’t think it’s George Gross—he generally liked women to have high, elegantly arched eyebrows. It could be the same artist that did this piece, posted at Sweetheart Sinner. The similarities are many, from the lacy outfit to the basic composition and perspective, but that piece is uncredited too. So the provenance of the above cover will remain a mystery for now. The inside content is also a bit of a mystery because it was posed by models. Did we mention that someone really needs to delve into the subject of crime magazine models? Not us, though. Please not us. Twenty scans below.

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Vintage Pulp Jan 24 2016
VIRTUOSO REALITY
Romance between two musical geniuses hits a few unexpected sour notes.


Classical musicians separated during the chaos of World War II are reunited in New York City, but the woman neglects to mention to her fiancée that she's acquired a lover and sugar daddy who happens to be a world renowned composer. Bette Davis gives a confident turn as a gifted and successful pianist, while Paul Henreid as her cellist fiancée and Claude Rains as the jilter lover are both excellent. The latter two actors also featured in Casablanca, and Deception bears some similarities to that earlier film in two ways—Henreid is lost during war and presumed dead, leading his love to turn to another; Rains is a caustic smartass, something he does really well.
 
Another aspect of Deception we enjoyed was how much work went into making Davis and Henried perform like master musicians. In Davis’s case, she fakes it on piano just long enough to pass the eye test, while Henreid had a hidden cellist insert his arms through a modified jacket and play the parts blind. It’s an, um, deceptively simple solution that worked perfectly. Deception didn’t perform well at the box office when released in 1946, but time has been kind to it, and criticisms have waned. At the very least you may want to watch it to get a gander at Davis’s spectacular loft apartment.

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Vintage Pulp Jan 23 2016
YES SHE CAN
You know what? I know we’re supposed to be disaffected and rebellious and all that, but I’m actually quite satisfied at this moment.


Two hard-luck juvenile delinquents find each other and fall in love in the slums of New York City, but can they keep it together when their surroundings threaten to destroy them? That's the basic idea of Yield to the Night. Author Jack Karney specialized in this, writing about East Side gangs in many novels, including Work of Darkness, Cry Brother Cry, Cop, and Tough Town. 1960 copyright on the above, with Rafael DeSoto cover art. 

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Modern Pulp Jan 22 2016
CANDID CAMERA
How far would you go to get the perfect shot?


A freelance photographer who has spent his career documenting the mean streets of New York City, always arriving in the aftermath of terrible events, finds himself presented with the opportunity to photograph a gangland massacre at the instant it occurs. One crime family has decided to wipe out another and Joe Pesci's Leon Bernstein, aka the Great Bernzini, knows where and when it will happen. He wants up close photos and the only way he can get them is to be in the restaurant where the killings will happen. After two decades of seeing his photography ignored by the art world, he thinks pulling off this feat will make everyone take notice of him. Bernzini is reckless the same way Jimmy Stewart is in Rear Window, but in less cartoonish fashion because we’re taken inside his thought process and made to understand it.

There's more here of course—love, loneliness, social status, musings about art—but the shootout and whether Bernzini is crazy enough to shut himself in a room where one stray bullet could end his life is what the film is really about. The Public Eye, which appeared in 1992, was a clear influence (along with the French film Man Bites Dog), on the acclaimed 2014 thriller Nightcrawler, but this one is a period piece, set during 1942. While the historical details are convincing, director Howard Franklin and cinematographer Peter Suschitztky don't aim for a true noir look. The filmscape is dark, but not technically stylish. Still it's good, and it benefits from Pesci, who has a way of inhabiting roles to the extent that you can't imagine anyone else playing them. He makes the movie work.

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The Naked City Jan 6 2016
FACTS OF DEATH
Sensational crimes with a side order of sex.


This issue of Best True Fact Detective which hit newsstands this month in 1950 came from Newsbook Publishing Corp. out of New York City. The magazine had some fantastic covers, but most were uncredited. Some of the artists that worked for the magazine around 1950 include greats like George Gross and Fred Rodewald, but this is the work of Howell Dodd, a fact we discovered with a bit of research. This is great work from him, and you can see more of his output here and here.
 
Inside the magazine you get various procedural stories sexualized by the editors with blurbs like, "Sex-Starved Women are Coffin-Bait!" and photo captions like, "Officers saw the body of a young girl who in life had been a raving, desirable beauty!" Beyond morbid, if you ask us, but the actual stories are professionally written and informative, with art consisting of photo-illustrations posed by professional models. Has anybody written anything substantive about this bizarre subset of the modeling industry? If not they should, because it's fascinating.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 30 2015
NO WAY IN HELL
Going nowhere fast in Harlem.


Hell Up in Harlem premiered in the U.S. today in 1973. It was the sequel to Black Caesar, which had been a surprise hit in cinemas a mere ten months earlier. The rush to make a follow-up shows. Hell Up in Harlem is eleven different kinds of inept, a tableau of repellent characters, bad scripting, and poorly staged action. It's not as if ambitions were low here. The movie tells the story of a Harlem crime kingpin who becomes pitted against his devious and ambitious father, imparting the lesson that family relationships come apart like tissue paper if the profit motive is strong enough. Yes, there was a good movie in here somewhere, but it never quite gelled. However Hell Up in Harlem does feature some of the best promo photos we've seen from the blaxploitation genre, and we've posted a few just below. The time it will take you to look at these four photos ismore than the amount of time the fight scene lasts—another flaw of Hell Up in Harlem. The shots show star Fred Williamson in mortal combat with Mindi Miller, who appeared in many films, including Westworld, Body Double, and Amazons. You can find these images around the internet, and she's misidentified on every single one of those websites—even Getty Images—as Gloria Hendry, who she clearly isn't. We also have, below, a great nude promo of Williamson. About time we featured a naked guy, right? Well, don't blame us for the lack. They just didn't make much in the way of nude male promos back then—especially ones like this. And speaking of unexpected, what's that dark shape between Williamson's thighs? We bet he didn't plan on showing that. But don't let it entice into you watching the movie. You'll regret it.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 28 2015
THROUGH THE KEYHOLE
Can you really teach an old dog new tricks?

Above is another issue of the NYC based tabloid Keyhole, this one published today in 1972, and it's the fifth we’ve scanned and shared. British model Susan Shaw, a constant presence in 1970s tabs, puts in another appearance here along with centerfold Barbara Stand. So how does one pick up younger women when one is over forty, as the cover asks? Various experts agree—don’t try to act like a kid, be self-confident, and aim for women around age thirty because they're often willing to look at guys ten years or more older. Seems reasonable enough. But on the other hand, if you can’t figure those things out without a cheapie tabloid’s help we suspect you’re destined to screw up in myriad other ways. See more from Keyhole at our tabloid index, located here. 

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Vintage Pulp Dec 15 2015
THAT THING YOU DO
He lives in a fetid swamp, has terrible grooming habits, and zero career prospects. But at least he listens to me.

David V. Reed’s, aka David Vern’s The Thing That Made Love was originally published in Mammoth Detective in 1943 as The Metal Monster Murders. The first paperback version appeared in 1946 as I Thought I’d Die, and the above version from New York City’s Universal Publishing and Distributing Corporation, which marketed digest sized paperbacks under the imprint Uni-Book, hit stores in 1951 with Robert Stanley cover art. What you get here is a man blamed for murder, but who claims the slayings were the work of a metal swamp monster. The women die battered, but with ecstatic facial expressions. Which raises the question—what exactly is happening to them? You can read a review of the book here 

Update: We learned that Stanley's cover art also appeared in 1952 on Florenz Branch's Whipping Room, for Intimate Novels. Often these cover reworks are clumsy, but we think this makeover is actually pretty good. Not as good as the original, but close.

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The Naked City Dec 6 2015
MURDER, U.S.A.
Chaos and carnage from coast to coast.

Fotocrime is another offering from Digest Publications, Inc., the NYC outfit that gave the world Exclusive, He, and other newsstand treats. The above magazine appeared this month in 1954, was the premier issue, and is exactly what its title says—a compendium of crime photography and the stories behind them, spiced with a bit of celebrity content. Because it's digest sized the text scans at a readable size, so we don't have to explain much. You can have a look and see what it's all about yourself. Of special note are the crime movie reviews, the anti-handgun article, and the True Detective-style feature entitled “Fotoclue” that challenges readers to solve a hypothetical murder. Forty scans below.

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
February 14
1929—Seven Men Shot Dead in Chicago
Seven people, six of them gangster rivals of Al Capone's South Side gang, are machine gunned to death in Chicago, Illinois, in an event that would become known as the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. Because two of the shooters were dressed as police officers, it was initially thought that police might have been responsible, but an investigation soon proved the killings were gang related. The slaughter exceeded anything yet seen in the United States at that time.
February 13
1935—Jury Finds Hauptmann Guilty
A jury in Flemington, New Jersey finds Bruno Hauptmann guilty of the 1932 kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby, the son of Charles Lindbergh. Hauptmann is sentenced to death and executed in 1936. For decades, his widow Anna, fights to have his named cleared, claiming that Hauptmann did not commit the crime, and was instead a victim of prosecutorial misconduct, but her claims are ultimately dismissed in 1984 after the U.S. Supreme Court refuses to address the case.
February 12
1961—Soviets Launch Venus Probe
The U.S.S.R. launches the spacecraft Venera 1, equipped with scientific instruments to measure solar wind, micrometeorites, and cosmic radiation, towards planet Venus. The craft is the first modern planetary probe. Among its many achievements, it confirms the presence of solar wind in deep space, but overheats due to the failure of a sensor before its Venus mission is completed.
1994—Thieves Steal Munch Masterpiece
In Oslo, Norway, a pair of art thieves steal one of the world's best-known paintings, Edvard Munch's "The Scream," from a gallery in the Norwegian capital. The two men take less than a minute to climb a ladder, smash through a window of the National Art Museum, and remove the painting from the wall with wire cutters. After a ransom demand the museum refuses to pay, police manage to locate the panting in May, and the two thieves, as well as two accomplices, are arrested.

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